Toyota develops new pedestrian safety technology with steer assist

Every major automaker is making steps towards autonomous vehicles and the first steps are as a rule of thumb semi-autonomous systems for both safety and convenience.

Toyota has developed a Pre-collision System (PCS) that uses automatic steering in addition to increased pre-collision braking force and automatic braking to help prevent collisions with pedestrians.

The new safety system is mainly all about people who are not in the car, involving pedestrians and other vulnerable road users.

Once the system via on-board sensors determines that there is a risk of collision, it issues an audio and visual alarm to encourage the driver to take evasive action. The increased pre-collision braking force and automatic braking functions are also activated.

In case the system determines that a collision cannot be avoided by braking alone and there is sufficient room for avoidance, steer assist is activated to steer the vehicle away from the pedestrian.

Toyota plans to have the Pedestrian-avoidance with no steer assist out by 2015 on a wider range of vehicles, before introducing PCS with Pedestrian-avoidance Steer Assist.

PRESS RELEASE (click to expand)


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