Top 3 Futuristic Car Concept Ideas

BMW Gina conceptNot so long ago, people were going around on horses and the rumor of a motored vehicle was almost unbelievable. Technology and design has made tremendous progress in not much more than a century… What if the best is yet to come? Here are three car concepts that brings car engineering to a new level and that gives an idea of what the future has in store for us.

The Shape Changing Car (BMW GINA)

GINA (acronym for Geometry and functions In “N” Adaptation) is a BMW prototype whose most striking feature is its shape-shifting body, made of polyurethane-coated lycra. The flexible fabric is coated on a transformational aluminum frame. It can be modified according to the taste of the driver and adapts to the driving situation.

BMW’s goal was to create a tighter, more intimate bond between the driver and the car and to make the driving experience more “emotional”.  The prototype, in its current form, will never be manufactured and put on the market. It was only designed to push the boundaries of automotive conception and challenge the conventional processes. The GINA’s avant-garde features will undoubtedly inspire future generation of car makers. According to BMW in a promotional video of the GINA, “the relationship between humans and their cars will change.”

The Magnetic Powered Concept Car (MAG)

The MAG, an eco-friendly three-wheeled prototype conceived by the Slovakian designer Matúš Procháczka, uses an electric engine that is fuelled by magnetic power. In order to allow magnetic powered cars to be used on a daily basis, roads would have to contain magnets with a polarity that matches the one of the car’s engine. Although there is a long way to go until this dream comes true, magnetic powered cars are opening doors to some really interesting options for the future of green power.

The Flying Car

Believe it or not, personal air vehicles –  or PAVs, as referred to by the NASA – aren’t so far from becoming real. Terrafugia, an American aeronautical engineering company performed a flight test of their Transition prototype last year, and, according to them, the experience was conclusive and satisfying.

The Transition is a compact, simplified aircraft. You can learn to drive/fly it after taking a mere 20 hours Transition specific flying class. It can comfortably seat two passengers, has a top speed of 115 mph on firm ground and a road gas mileage of 6.7L/100km. You can already pre-order your $279,000 Transition through the Terrafugia website – it should be available on the market in a few years. But before you get too excited, you should know that the Transition needs a minimum of 1700 feet to take-off, which means that you won’t be able to fly your way out of traffic jams!

Mireille is a travel, music and theater enthusiast. She wrote for the stage and television, and is now working as a freelance blogger for MotoIllimitees.com, a moto dealer.


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  • Sean Dominey

    I do like the idea of these cars, but I am a little concerned that magnetic powered cars could affect computers, phones and pace makers.

    Do you know if tests have begun with these cars or are they still in the design phase? 

    • the technology is still in very early stages, but I do expect to hear more about it in the coming years.

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