The car that runs on SALTWATER

QUANT e-Sportlimousine

This car was first seen at the Geneva Motor Show in 2014 and is the Quant e-Sportlimousine. It has just gained its acceptance from Germany’s TUV Sud and can be driven on any German or European roads. Here GoMotorTrade talk about the new saltwater car…

The car is basically an electric car that is driven by four motors but the difference is that the battery doesn’t need to be recharged for 12 hours when it runs out; instead the car uses two tanks that are refilled with salt water.

The technology used is called the nanoFLOWCELL and this technology powers an almost 800-horsepower supercar.

Here are the basics of fuel cell technology: A fuel cell in the car is continuously passing the energy source through itself. The fuel cell has oxygen passing through one side and hydrogen passing through the other in which the atom electron is taken out and flows into the additional electric circuit to supply power. The electron will then go back to the fuel cell passing through the return circuit and then the proton will bond with the oxygen which therefore creates water.

The nanoFLOWCELL works very similarly but it has replaced the hydrogen (which is expensive) and one side takes a combination of metallic salts and water whereas the other side takes a mixture which is very low in salts. Just like the basic fuel cell shows, the power is taken off the salty side, using a membrane (which is used by the load) and then placed back to the side with the mixture that is very low in salts.

The makers promise a car that has zero emissions and can go for 600 kilometres. At Geneva Motor Show, Le Vecchia said “We are delighted as pioneers to be able to present an automobile driven by flow cell technology on public roads, and one which achieves not only fantastic performance values but also zero emissions.” He then said “a projected top speed of over 350 km/h (217.5 mph), acceleration from 0-100 in 2.8 seconds, a torque of four times 2,900 Nm (2,139 lb-ft) and a range of more than 600 km (373 mi).”

NanoFlowcell AG Chairman of the Board Professor, Jens-Peter Ellermann said: “We’ve got major plans, and not just within the automobile industry the potential of the NanoFlowcell is much greater, especially in terms of domestic energy supplies as well as in maritime, rail and aviation technology. The NanoFlowcell offers a wide range of applications as a sustainable, low cost and environmentally-friendly source of energy.”

The car is quite long because of the big ‘fuel’ tanks needed; it is 5.25 metres long which is half a foot longer than a Toyota minivan! Another advantage that the car offers is the lessened risk factor in petrol stations because there would be no risk of explosion! Businesses may be unwilling to invest money into the filling stations because they don’t know whether anyone will actually purchase these cars. Even though, hydrogen filling stations are growing as the number of hydrogen cars being bought is growing too, so there is hope!

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