The best looking cars ever

When it comes to cars, it’s what’s inside that really counts – but, if you want a motor you can really be proud of, it certainly doesn’t hurt if the outside’s pretty special too.

Here are just some the most memorable good-lookers of the motor world from the past five decades; the ones that everyone once wanted to trade up to when it came time to buy a car.

If you’re based in the UK then consider buying a car from the car people. Around 95% of their customers would buy from them again and they make it quite simple to test drive a car. Although you probably won’t be able to buy any of the ones listed below, still worth a shot.

Anyway which of the below is your favourite?

Cadillac Series 62 Eldorado

The Eldorado saw Cadillac venture into more subdued territory, with the exaggerated tail-fin and aerospace style design of its 1950s models pared down into something a little more understated for the new decade.

Ferrari 308 GTB

Made famous as TV detective Magnum’s car of choice, the sleek Ferrari 308 GTB is one of the best loved sports cars ever and a true Italian stallion.

Lamborghini Countach

This 1974-1990 wonder came complete with futuristic-feeling scissor doors and was constructed the same way as a racing car; aircraft-grade aluminium over a tubular space frame makes the Lamborghini Countach both strong and extremely light.

GTO Judge

One of the original and best cars in the ‘muscle car’ genre, the GTO Judge is the ultimate representation of the seventies penchant for a long bonnet, sloping roof, and, of course, the all-important spoiler.

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

This truly elegant car, with its flowing, undulating lines, is made the more special by those gullwing doors. It’ll set you back a pretty penny if you want to pick up one of these beauties today, though – an original 1956 Gullwing model recently sold for $1.15 million.

Mazda RX-7

The Mazda RX-7 offered an incredibly powerful engine and a relatively-affordable $7,000 price tag, which meant it was within the reach of more motorists than most of the other cars on our list.

Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit

The eighties might largely be known as the decade that taste forgot, but this very special car from the eternally iconic Rolls-Royce brand was very much the exception to the rule.

Austin-Healey 3000

The oldest car in our countdown, the characterful Austin-Healey 3000 (sometimes known as the “Big Healey”) is a quintessentially British car that was the pinnacle in luxurious, high speed driving from 1959 to 1967.

Delorean DMC-12

The Delorean DMC-12 was of course immortalised in the Back to the Future trilogy. And though the real-life car unfortunately wasn’t capable of time travel, the cool factor ensured that this gull-winged, stainless steel marvel sold in droves.

Porsche 911

Originally unveiled at the 1963 Frankfurt IAA Motor Show, the very first Porsche 911s delivered top speeds of 130mph. And, hundreds of different versions later, this particularly gorgeous model’s still going strong today.

Corvette Sting Ray

Who could resist the hugely popular Corvette Sting Ray sports car, which perfectly combines powerful performance with style? And its appeal endures to this day – in 2004, Sports Car International named it number five on its list of ‘Top Sports Cars of the 1960s’.


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  • leej

    Karmann Ghia should be at the top of the list

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