NASCAR Guide for Beginners

NASCAR is an exciting sport to watch and gamble on but it can be a little intimidating to get into at first. There are a few facts to be aware of before you dive into the world of racing and more than a few myths to dispel too.

First off, the acronym stands for the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, which is pretty self-explanatory. If you’re looking to gamble on races then it’s important to be aware of what odds mean and just how you go about it. There are many sites like www.pgbingo.com that explain how to play bingo, casino games and other forms of gambling, though they may not have an in depth NASCAR guide. We’re here to get you in the driver’s seat and have you watching these games while knowing exactly who is in the lead.

When you’re watching a NASCAR race the length of the track will vary and this is where most racetracks get their name from. Take the Honor QuikTrip 500 for example, in which racers go around a 1.54 mile track 325 times, giving a total of 500 miles. They generally sit around 400 to 600 miles in total, the Coca Cola 600 is one of the longest of these races to have existed.

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The cars are entirely different to your average car in a number of ways, including:

  • Horsepower: Consumer cars have an average horsepower of around 150HP, when it comes to NASCAR this is amped up to 850HP.
  • Weight: To use this horsepower effectively, the cars have to be lighter and more equipped to barrel around the track. Road cars are usually 4,000lbs or more but the stripped back stock cars you’ll see in NASCAR races are around 3,200lbs.
  • Mechanics: As you’ll see in every race, these cars head into a pit stop where they’re quickly stripped down and have parts replaced. Every part of these cars are built to be changed quickly and replaced with ease in case of any damage.

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The NASCAR season lasts for 38 races at 23 tracks, on which each driver can accumulate 36 points. There are 43 drivers per race and to get to the Sprint Cup, which is the highest accolade in the sport, they must accumulate these points. It’s not as simple as being first for these games, as there is a points based system that awards these to the best drivers – determined by a number of factors. From there, the 12 top drivers from the first races go through to the real competition, The Chase for the Sprint Cup. This consists of another 10 races, where more points are allocated and the driver with the most wins the tournament.

During the races viewers will see up to six coloured flags which each serve a purpose:

ColourMeaning
GreenStart driving
YellowCaution (debris or a crash)
Red Stop
BlackTime penalty added to driver (for breaking a rule)
WhiteOne more lap
CheckeredThe winner has crossed the finish line

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