Matters Arising From The 2017 Canadian Grand Prix

The 2017 edition of the mother of all races which is the Canadian grand prix has come and gone, and we are waiting for the 2018 edition. However, it would be very good to take a look at the race and cars that took part in the 2017 edition in retrospect.

If you are talking about what you expect in the 2018 race, you must consider what the 2017 race offered us. Change they say is constant, and that was once again witnessed in the motor gp sports sector this year. This was mostly experienced in the vehicles that took part in the race. There were some significant changes to the composition of different parts of the cars and every motor racing enthusiast should know about these.

Of course, for a long time since the race started, no year has witnessed the level of regulation shake up that was witnessed prior to the 2017 edition. This comes after the introduction of the hybrid turbo powered engines, which many people still see as the game changer in 2014.

Tyres

One of the areas that witnessed changes before the kickoff of the Canadian grand prix is the tyres of the cars. There was an approval for these to be 25% wider than the ones used in 2016. This made provision for an improved rear width from 325mm to 405. While at the front, the width was improved from 245 to 305. While the size of the wheel rim was not touched, the diameter of the tyre was also increased by a few numbers.

Front Wing and Rear Wing

There was also a slight increase on these areas. The front wing according to the Canadian grand prix news that came before the event was moved from 1650mm to 1800mm. In the rear wing, the height got reduced from the hitherto 950mm to just 800mm. other things that were touched in this area are the overall width of the cars. This jumped to 2000mm from the previous 1800mm.

The Diffuser, Side-Pods and Weight

There is also an increase in height, and the advantage of this is that it bequeaths more power to the diffuser. The height moved up from 125mm to 175 and the width got up from 1000mm to 1050. The diffuser now extends to the rear wheel axle line because it has become longer. The side-pods of the new car are now 1600mm in width, away from the former 1400mm, giving the cars wider bodywork. The weight also got increased from the former 702kg to 722kg plus the tyres.

Power Units

What we have here is a change in rules, and the major reason is to prevent drivers from having a lot of power unit elements in their cars. Only one power unit element is allowed for any driver during a single event. Anything more than this, will gain the driver a grid penalty.  And for all the future events, the driver can only use the last installed element. In the bid to bring down the cost of power units, mitigate the performance gap between the engines, and to ensure that the customer teams get what they need, some rules were also introduced.

  • €1m per season is the new cost of power unit for customer teams.
  • There is now an obligation to supply clause in the homologation procedure, and this comes to life when a team faces lack of supply.
  • There is no longer a token system for the in-season engine development
  • There are also some other constraints on areas of boost pressure, dimensions, and materials and power unit part weights.

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